Your Health: You’re in Charge

Take charge of your health and get tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs or STDs). One of the most common STIs is chlamydia and most people don’t know they have it because it usually does not show symptoms. If you’re having vaginal, oral, or anal sex, get tested every year to make sure you’re safe (especially if you are under 25 years old).
 

proportion of STIs among young people

Source: cdc.gov 

 

Los Angeles County has the highest total number of chlamydia infections in the U.S. Don't wait to get tested. 

Girl getting tested
Get Tested Now

Call your doctor’s office and ask to be tested. Your results are confidential and won’t be shared with anyone without your permission. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain. The first step to a solution is identifying the problem. 

Why Get Tested?

Consequences of STIs

  • Chlamydia usually shows no symptoms, but when untreated can cause permanent damage. It can even leave you infertile if untreated.
  • Chlamydia is very common in young women. 
  • Getting tested is easy and painless with a simple urine test.
  • Chlamydia is easy to treat with antibiotics. 
How Do I Get Tested?
  • Just call your doctor’s office and ask to be tested. Your results are confidential and won’t be shared with anyone without your permission.
  • Make an appointment just to be screened or ask for a STI test during a scheduled visit. Your doctor can even mail you a lab order if you don’t have time for a visit. It’s simple!
  • Search for a clinic where you can get tested:  teensource.org/find-a-clinic
How Often Should I Get Tested?

If you are sexually active and under 25 years old, get tested for chlamydia every year. If you’re over 25, ask your doctor when you should get tested.

Visit myhealthmyinfo.org to learn more about how to keep your health info private.

How is Chlamydia Treated?

If you test positive for chlamydia, treatment is quick and simple. You may receive a one-time dose of antibiotics, or you may need to take the antibiotics for 5-10 days. In most cases, you will get better within one to two weeks. 

How Can I Reduce My Risk of Getting Chlamydia?
  • Use a condom every time you have sex (vaginal, oral, or anal).
  • Limit your number of sex partners.
  • Get tested at least once per year.
  • Avoid douching.

Check out teensource.org or text HOOKUP to 877877 for tips on safe sex.